Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread

Do you want to know a secret? I’ve never been a very confident baker. When I was in high school, I could handle boxed brownie mix and plain homemade sugar cookies, but that was about it. When I went to college, I tried making more unique homemade baked goods, but I quickly shied away after a handful of failed recipes that occurred as the result of me doing things like eyeballing flour and using olive oil when we were out of eggs.

Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread is simple to make and has a wonderful nutty, warm quality that vaguely reminds me of Christmas.

Over the past year, I’ve tried to venture into the baking realm, rebuilding my baking self-esteem one successful recipe at a time. Next to my White Chocolate Peanut Butter Blondies, I think this is one of the easiest homemade baked goods I’ve ever made. And if I may say so, this shortbread is really good. Courtesy of the ample nutmeg, they have a wonderful nutty, warm quality that vaguely reminds me of Christmas.

Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread is simple to make and has a wonderful nutty, warm quality that vaguely reminds me of Christmas.

I used Bob’s Red Mill Oat Flour, but you could always try making your own oat flour at home in the food processor. You can leave the tightly-wrapped dough in the fridge to chill anywhere from one hour to three days ahead of baking.

Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread is simple to make and has a wonderful nutty, warm quality that vaguely reminds me of Christmas.

Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Salted Dark Chocolate Oatmeal Shortbread is simple to make and has a wonderful nutty, warm quality that vaguely reminds me of Christmas.
Serves: 20 cookies
Ingredients
  • • 1¼ cups oat flour
  • • ¼ cup rolled oats
  • • ½ cup unsalted butter, room temperature
  • • ½ cup turbinado sugar
  • • 2 tablespoons vanilla extract
  • • 1 egg
  • • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • • 3 oz dark chocolate, roughly chopped
  • • flaked sea salt for garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar together with a wooden spoon or hand mixer. Add the vanilla and egg and mix again. Gradually add the oat flour, rolled oats, all-purpose flour, salt, and nutmeg and combine, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. The dough will be fairly dry.
  2. Using your hands, roll the dough into a log about 3 inches in diameter. Roll the log in plastic wrap and chill in the fridge at least one hour (and it can be left in the fridge, tightly wrapped, for up to three days).
  3. Preheat the oven to 350º and grease a baking sheet.
  4. Slice the log into ½-inch discs and spread on the baking sheet 2 inches apart. Bake until the edges begin to turn light brown, about 14 to 16 minutes.
  5. When the cookies have cooled, melt the chocolate in a double boiler (if you're a lazy baker, you can melt it in the microwave in really short iterations, stirring frequently until chocolate is smooth).
  6. Arrange the cookies over a sheet of parchment paper for easy clean-up. Use a spoon to drizzle the chocolate over the tops of the cookies in a zig-zag motion. Sprinkle a bit of flaked sea salt over the top of each cookie. Store in an airtight container.

Adapted from The Sprouted Kitchen

Comments

  1. says

    I think we’ve all had our fair share of baking disasters over the years. My worst one was a strawberry cupcake that had the strangest and grossest consistency. It was almost gelatinous… but solid. Ick.

    That being said, these shortbread cookies look and sound amazing! I normally don’t make shortbread except for around the holidays. Clearly, I should give it a go now because oh my goodness, I desperately want one fo these now!

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